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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> a juvenile court hearing was held for two boys. a 15-year-old committed suicide after pictures of a sexual attack were released. robert handa live with what could happen next. >> reporter: the first steps toward a possible trial took place here at the juvenile center. we were told by parties involved a judge was going to decide whether to keep the accused boys detained here or be released to their parents. the big legal decision remains, will they be tried as adults. >> reporter: the family of audrey pot and their legal team arrived this morning. the judge likely reminded everybody in the courtroom that today's hearing must be kept private and the pots family did so by leaving the center through a back entrance. leaving a message for the media. >> the hearings are confident because they involve juveniles. >>> whether a decision was made has not made public. a deputy attorney refused to confirm any details but said it would be up to his office whether juven
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
are a vulnerable group. >> generally speaking you need the environment in which they were flourish and which they can work together. you need the context. >> rose: if they are good -- >> it will happen with the actor speaking the text and somebody listening. you don't need the director for that you need somebody to organize it all. >> rose: how much do you want to act? >> you know, i always juggled both. and i read -- as i joined strad for as an actor i read a piece of fla ubert that said most people in life end up what they do second best. >> rose: by dereking you are doing what you do second best? >> no first best. >> rose: as a actor you were seco best? >> other people could my the parts i was playing. i suppose i could see. i like to stand back and see the whole -- >> rose: it's an interesting idea because you think about shaping other things. the idea is how do you make a decision as to what it is you do best, not second best? and how do you drill down on that so you are truly being creative and bringing something that no one else has? i'm sure people are smart at self evaluation and th
to protect your device from the environment. that's generally where they've been used. colombia, thailand, maybe even in pakistan. so it is kind of odd that they would use that here in a domestic setting. but, again, they don't know -- they don't have any suspect at all. >> it's also important to point out that this is an investigation where all of the resources and intelligence community are being used and they will have a backlog of intelligence they have to go through, intercept, satellite intelligence, signal intelligence, which they can monitor all of this stuff in realtime. >> they can't. and from what they monitor on a daily basis, minute-by-minute basis, from known suspects around the world, they had zero indication from this event. now you go back based on what happened and what you do know, you check cell phone towers and those international conversations and run your traffic through suspicious groups around the world. just speaking to the boston law enforcement source, a federal source earlier today, and a sense of is it domestic? is it international, the answer i got from both
random metal and debris things picked up from the environment. all of that being pulled out of the bombing victims, bill. >> bill: tomorrow is going to be another emotional day. what are the plans as we understand them tonight, mike for the presidents visit at that church behind you? >> well, the president will come here to the cathedral of the holy cross just about 11:00. he will be accompanied by the first lady. it will be an interfaith service. the president is said to be delivering a message of shared pain not just with the people who were in the run itself or the people who live here in boston but the people -- the people in the run itself. and a shared sense of respect to the people who responded and saved lives. no word now if the president intends to visit with the victims and/or their families, bill. >> bill: mike, thanks. see you tomorrow. mike tobin from the church tonight. we are also hearing tonight from a hero by the name of tyler who helped comfort a young woman suffering shrapnel wounds from the terrorist attacks. yesterday the massachusetts governor devol pa
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
something. if you see somebody carrying something odd that doesn't fit in the environment, you should seek out law enforcement and bring it to their attention. >> gretchen: you say to look at the people around you. even to the point of no problem staring at them. why? >> yes. as people, we don't like to look at people. anything more than two seconds, you're scary and being rude. you know what? be rude. pay attention to who is next to you. what are they wearing? how do they look? how are they carrying themselves? look at their behaviors. what are they communicating to you not just verbally, but nonverbally. >> gretchen: know where you will evacuate. oftentimes when people get on airplanes, they'll say i'm five rows from the nearest exit. you're talking about just in general, right? >> yes. whether indoors or outdoors. this specific event, you're barricaded in in an area. you're watching the marathon go on. when you get there, assess. if something happens, i want two ways out. if something happens on this side, i will go out this way. if something happens on this side, i will go out that way
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)